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Why "Captain America- The First Avenger" Won't Save the Superhero Movie

Why "Captain America- The First Avenger" Won't Save the Superhero Movie

  • "Captain America: The First Avenger" is pulling a 72 percent positive rating on Rotten Tomates, with 86 percent of the audience saying they want to go see "The Avengers" lead-in film. NY Times' A.O. Scott has described the film as having "a winningly pulpy, jaunty, earnest spirit," while EW's Owen Gilberman calls it "the definition of a square, competent, deliver-the-goods blockbuster."

    So, with all the hype around it, why is "Captain America: The First Avenger" only expected to bring in around $55 million at the box office? Many do not expect Marvel's film to beat out "Harry Potter," which is in second week in theaters. The answer is simple: The public may have a bad case of superhero fatigue.

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    (Credit: Fizziology)

  • Marvel's two other superhero movies this summer, "Thor" and "X-Men: First Class," have had great reviews and have been considered successes at the box office, but each has seen less buzz online than the movie preceding it. In fact, out of the superhero movies released this summer, "Captain America" has had the least buzz online the week before release, according tosocial media box office stats site Fizziology.

    "One troubling aspect of' Captain America: The First Avenger's' buzz is its low positives," said Ben Carlson, co-creator and president of Fizziology, in an email to What's Trending.

    "Negatives are almost non-existant at one percent. But, sky-high neutrals and only 29 percent positives indicate that the movie may be creating chatter, but not necessarily mainstream love," he added, pointing out those who like the movie are overwhelmingly going online to proclaim their superhero love.

    That means "Captain America's" move to premiere at Comic Con to a nerd audience was a smart one, but it doesn't necessarily mean it will be a box office winner. The movie also had select screenings in military bases, again hoping to tap into its demographic. But, when you are a movie that cost $140 million to make, you'll need those key viewers to buy more than one ticket.

    Another problem that "Captain America" is facing besides the superhero dilemma? There's not enough 3D screens to go around. With "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II" still talking over many of the screens across the country, many viewers will have to settle for regular (and cheaper) version of the flick. That means less box office bucks all around -- but then again, "Captain America" was only converted into 3D, so maybe you're better off with that good old 2D version? The lack of advanced technology will probably make it seem more authentic to the time period the movie is supposed to take place in anyway.

    Are you sick of superhero movies? Will you catch "Captain America" this weekend?

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