VIDEO: Paramedics FAINTED on the Job For a VIRAL Challenge

The #IdibalaChallenge is sweeping through South Africa and shows participants dancing to music star King Monada’s song, “Malwedhe,” and then pretending to faint mid video.

These paramedics are facing disciplinary action after participating in the #IdibalaChallenge while on duty.

The #IdibalaChallenge is sweeping through South Africa and shows participants dancing to music star King Monada’s song, “Malwedhe,” and then pretending to faint mid video. But of course, as with any viral trend it’s becoming dangerous. People are pretending to faint while driving, and dancing dangerously in the street. But these paramedics took it to the next level for doing the challenge while driving AND on duty.

A spokesperson for the Roads Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) said: “Emergency medical personnel routinely respond to road crashes and should, therefore, understand the danger of distracted driving and failure to use safety belts. We hope that this sanction will send a strong message to all other public officials to desist from behaviour that compromises safety while driving official state vehicles.”

But these two aren’t the only paramedics to participate. With cameras and internet connection available to us nearly every moment of the day, it’s no wonder people sometimes cross the line at work.

Remember the security guard who recorded himself farting while on the job, or the guy who posted a photo of himself licking tacos at work. And the bitter barista who created an anonymous blog featuring satirical complaints about barista life

The internet is flooded with cautionary tales of people getting fired from their posts on social media. Top creator Shane Dawson was even famously fired from Jenny Craig after posting a video of himself and co-workers pole dancing while on the job.

Though, it kind of worked out of him, which is a RARE exception. Potential employers now look at candidate’s social media platforms before hiring them on.

According to a survey done in 2016 by CareerBuilder, 60% of employers used social media to determine where the candidate meets the job requirements, and let’s not even get into how many people are fired after their racist rant videos go viral.

But do you think people should be fired for social media posts? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter at @WhatsTrending.

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