Ben Shapiro and Candace Owens tried to drag Harry Styles for wearing a dress in his vogue cover photo shoot and people are not letting it go. Styles was the first man to be featured solo on the cover of  “Vogue.” The 26 year old singer is known for having an appreciation for fashion and a gender bending approach to style. “Clothes are there to have fun with and experiment with and play with. What’s really exciting is that all of these lines are just kind of crumbling away. When you take away ‘There’s clothes for men and there’s clothes for women,’ once you remove any barriers, obviously you open up the arena in which you can play,” Styles told Vogue.

“I’ll go in shops sometimes, and I just find myself looking at the women’s clothes thinking they’re amazing,” he continued. “It’s like anything—anytime you’re putting barriers up in your own life, you’re just limiting yourself. There’s so much joy to be had in playing with clothes. I’ve never really thought too much about what it means—it just becomes this extended part of creating something.”   Styles looked as gorgeous as ever as he donned a dress and different skirts for the photoshoot. Many praised Styles for “challenging traditional gender norms,” but the sight of him in a dress was apparently too much for some conservatives to handle. Ben Shapiro and Candace Owens had to give their two cents about the singer and songwriter’s fashion choices. 

In a viral tweet, Owens called it an attack on masculinity by the West and urged, “bring back manly man.” Of course the internet was not going to let her go unscathed after trying to insult the former One Direction member.

Ben Shapiro defended Owens, saying, “this is perfectly obvious. Anyone who pretends that it is not a referendum on masculinity for men to don floofy dresses is treating you as a full-on idiot,” he wrote.

“Masculinity and femininity exist,” he continued, when he should have stopped embarrassing himself. “Outward indicators of masculinity and femininity exist in nearly every human culture. Boys are taught to be more masculine in virtually every human culture because the role of men is not always the same as the role of women.”

“The Left knows this, of course. The POINT of Styles doing this photo shoot is to feminize masculinity. Otherwise why would it be headline-worthy for Styles to don a dress?” Shapiro added, to which a Twitter user replied:

Fans quickly came to Styles’ defense. Some commented how good Styles looked in the photoshoot, and (accurately) pointed out that in a dress or a skirt he would attract more women than most men wearing anything else. They also joked that anyone mad about Harry wearing a dress is just mad he pulls it off so well.

Others pointed out how gender is a construct, and masculinity is not defined by what you wear. And of course, there were those who pointed out that people should wear whatever they want and others should mind their own business.

 People also joked on twitter about Republicans “having a meltdown” over Harry Styles wearing a dress, literally getting mad over a piece of fabric.

Some people also pointed out how funny it was that Owens was criticizing Harry Styles for not being manly enough, when her own husband looks a little feminine himself. This may be taking it a bit far, but then again if you can question one man’s manliness, can’t you question them all?

Others made fun of Shapiro for acting like the spokesperson for masculinity.

Some also pointed out Giuliani once dressed as a woman and Republicans didn’t try to cancel him. For any who haven’t seen this footage, Rudy Giuliani performed a skit for a charity event where he dressed in drag. This was over ten years ago, but Donald Trump was also in the skit and called Giuliani’s character “really beautiful.”

Many celebrities came to his defense too. Olivia Wilde, who is directing Styles in an upcoming movie, called Owens “pathetic.” Jameela Jamil also responded.

Of course Owens and Shapiro’s mean spirited comments ignore the fact that heels, wigs, and even makeup were traditionally worn by men. It ignores the traditional Scottish kilt, which to this day is sometimes worn by men, it ignores the fact that skirts were the standard dressing for men and women in all ancient cultures in the Near East and Egypt, the ancient Greeks wore tunics (and the Romans adopted the same manner of dressing), and in Europe at least as recently as the late 1500’s men wore skirts. So it is not only narrow minded and bigoted, the comments are also incredibly historically inaccurate.