Photo: DarkoStojanovic
The people are asking

The events of the last few years have led many to start rethinking their goals, ambitions, hopes for the future, and the direction in which they want to take their careers. 2022 is finally here, and with it comes a wealth of promise, opportunity, and, unfortunately, in many cases, uncertainty.

If this is starting to sound a little too familiar, and you have recently been rethinking your own career choices, maybe the start of a new year is the perfect time to think about retraining, revisiting education, or branching out into an exciting, fulfilling, and meaningful new area of work. 

If you want to make a noticeable and highly impactful positive difference in countless lives throughout modern society, you could always consider nursing. 

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The possibilities in healthcare are certainly numerous, profoundly rewarding in a way that is unlike any other industry. Is now the right time? 

Access to Education

When the world first started locking down in various forms, there were many questions regarding whether or not the education sector was equipped enough to cater to remote learning. 

Great institutions the world over have proven that remote learning is not only entirely possible, but in some cases, extremely streamlined, flexible, and beneficial for the needs of the individual. 

For those of you looking to retrain as a nurse, this could be great news, as the online courses out there are of a spectacularly high standard and extremely accessible. This increased accessibility can hopefully unlock opportunities for more aspiring healthcare professionals everywhere who are looking to improve their careers; just check out some FNP programs online for a superb example of how revered institutions are able to offer elite education in a remote capacity and ensure career growth for those in the industry. 

The Demand for Nurses

The national demand for nurses has been caused by a myriad of factors, not least of all the increasing older population in the United States. The senior demographic is a huge part of the American population, and it needs to be nurtured and cared for on a regular basis. 

A nursing shortage could also be down to the burnout cycle, a perpetual issue that can be difficult to rectify without the introduction of new nurses across the country. 

Suffice to say, retraining to be a nurse could enable you to have a direct and meaningful impact on the wellbeing of society as a whole, which, if you are looking for a more fulfilling career, could be the best possible way to go. 

Hospital Staff Shortages

The staff shortages in hospitals are indeed a cause for concern, and it has a wider impact on American society as a whole. If anything, the situation has only served to prove that nurses play an invaluable, irreplaceable role in the sustainability of the entire modern landscape. It is quite a responsibility and one that must be fulfilled to ensure the longevity and the wellbeing of citizens everywhere. 

If there was any time in recent history when retraining as a nurse should be a prime consideration for empathic, driven, and ambitious individuals, it might be right now. 

Job Security

Job insecurity has been linked to increased anxiety, and it can be a monumentally stress-inducing feeling to have to deal with, particularly in today’s uncertain landscape. This rising concern has affected many of America’s workers over the last few years, especially, and it is not an easy position to find yourself in. 

The healthcare industry can offer that job security, that feeling of purpose, and that financial dependability that so many other industries cannot supply. 

A fully trained nurse should be able to expect to find themselves a role before too long, and although the field is competitive at times, it is also essential and in demand, so there is no need to worry too hard about whether or not the cost of your training will one day pay off or not. 

Helping Others

If your desire for a new role boils down to something as simple (yet nonetheless meaningful and important) as wanting to help others, then healthcare is likely one of your best bets, as that is essentially the sector’s whole deal. 

You may already have the professional skills needed to thrive in nursing, particularly if you have been thinking about wanting to support your fellow citizens in their time of need. 

Some of the key skills required include:

  • Empathy – An invaluable transferrable skill that provides the bedrock of what drives nurses through tough times. 
  • Leadership – Nurses are great leaders. They can make potentially life-saving decisions in the blink of an eye and solve complex problems whenever they might arise. This can be further developed when they take on more senior roles like FNPs. 
  • Communication – Without effective communication, most industries fall apart, no matter what field of work they happen to specialize in, and healthcare is no different. If you can communicate well, you probably have a wealth of other interpersonal skills that can help you flourish. 

Flexibility 

In the modern working landscape, one that might be a hybrid setup for years to come, flexibility appears to be the new hot topic.  

It is true that nurses end up working exceptionally long shifts, and sometimes in highly irregular time frames, but there is certainly some level of flexibility involved too. In fact, nursing may be more flexible than many other professions, partly down to the way in which the scheduling is done. 

For example, you would be able to choose your shifts to fit around your personal commitments, perhaps making it an ideal job for anyone who wishes to spend some more time with their family or continue with their education alongside their working day. 

Thanks to online learning, it is now possible to carry out your nursing duties as you study and train to take your career to the next level, thus opening doors to many more exciting opportunities in the process. 

Pandemic or Not

Whether or not another global pandemic is knocking on the door, there will always be a need for new nurses, so now is probably as good a time as any if you happen to be on the fence about retraining.