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Twitter's 6th Birthday, S Club 7 Reunites, Hines Ward Retires: While You Were Sleeping

Twitter's 6th Birthday, S Club 7 Reunites, Hines Ward Retires: While You Were Sleeping

  • While you were sleeping, stories were trending. Twitter turns six, UK pop group, S Club 7, sets a summer tour, Hines Ward takes his leave of the NFL, and the case of Amelia Earhart's disappearance gets a solid lead.

    Six years ago, on March 21, Jack Dorsey sent the first tweet: "just setting up my twitter." I'm sure he didn't understand how much of a monumental effort that was at the time, but today we can fully appreciate the value of this quirky, avian-inspired social service. With over 500 millions users to date, Twitter has become responsible for breaking some of the biggest news stories of the past couple of years, giving distributors and consumers a dynamic platform on which to communicate. Is Twitter up for another six or will acquisitions or another leading platform change its pace?

    S Club 7 will be reuniting for a two-album deal and set of summer tours. The group rose to fame in the late 90s when the seven members starred in their own BBC-produced TV shows, which then began to syndicate internationally. The members — put together by Spice Girls producer, Simon Fuller — have been receiving offers for years and have finally accepted a reportedly seven-figure deal. After all, "There ain't no party like an S Club party!"

  • Hines Ward, longtime Pittsburgh wide receiver, has announced his retirement from the NFL. According to Ward, he would rather quit the game altogether than play for a team other than the Steelers. He leaves a legacy of holding every significant frachise receiving record and two Super Bowl rings. If he stayed, it would've marked his 15th season.

    Yesterday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced that she would be looking into the fate of Amelia Earhart, who disappeared over the South Pacific 75 years ago. Thanks to a newly enhanced photo, we could have a clue as to the nature of the wreckage of Earhart's Lockheed Electra plane. Experts may have found the landing gear of the aircraft emerging from the waters off a remote island in the Pacific. A group of scientists and salvagers will be returning to the island in July to analyze the scene and, hopefully, put one of the 20th century's major mysteries to rest.

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