Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for Youtube
"This is the result of me listening and taking action."

On Friday, Lizzo released another song called “Grrrls” and fans were quick to lo listen as they await her new album. And although people associate upbeat and fun songs from Lizzo, and this song was no different, some responded with concerns and criticisms for a word used by the singer in the song. After fans heard the use of “spaz,” which is a word known to mock or humiliate disabled people, many reached out to her on Twitter and TikTok. While some people did not understand the issue, claiming it is a word that is used and means no harm, Lizzo listened to their concerns and released a new version of the song, this time without the word.

@louislevanti

If disabled people and disability activists are offended & hurt, then that means it’s offensive & hurtful and should not have been used! I think we’ll hear from Lizzo & her team soon once they have a plan of action. Education rather than cancellation is important here #lizzo #celebritynews #musicnews

♬ original sound – LOUIS LEVANTI

On Twitter, a user named Hannah tweeted Lizzo, writing “my disability Cerebral Palsy is literally classified as Spastic Diplegia (where spasticity refers to unending painful tightness in my legs) your new song makes me pretty angry + sad. ‘Spaz’ doesn’t mean freaked out or crazy. It’s an ableist slur. It’s 2022. Do better.” Merriam-Webster defines the word as “one who is inept” and even includes that the word is often offensive slang. Another person, Callum, noted, “As someone who champions women, plus size people and others whom society treats poorly, Lizzo preaches inclusivity and should do better.”

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Some tried to argue this represents another example of “cancel culture,” but many fans only wanted to remove the word and re-release a new version, but they did not want to see her stop performing or creating music. So, Lizzo listened and re-released a new version, which made many fans proud of her. Although some try to feign ignorance or play victim, Lizzo listened and apologized. She noted, “As a fat Black woman in America, I’ve had many hurtful words against me so I overstand the power words can have (whether intentionally or in my case, unintentionally).”

Many were grateful that she did this after listening to fans’ concerns and taking accountability. In response, one person wrote, “That’s it guys, that’s all we ask from famous people, to when they make mistakes they own it, apology, grow and learn with that.”